#HUNTERTWENTYEIGHT: 28 WETTEST PLACES ON PLANET EARTH

To celebrate the 28 handcrafted parts that make up a pair of Hunter Boots we are launching a monthly list of 28 items on the 28th of each month. Kicking the lists off we have the 28 wettest places on planet earth (aka: the 28 places your Wellingtons would love to visit!).
 
1. Cherrapunji, India - While India is known for its monsoon season, the city of Cherrapunji is the only place where these monsoons can be experienced all year long. These regular rains have earned it multiple Guinness World Records for “Wettest Place on Earth”.
 
2. Debundscha, Cameroon  - Debundscha, Cameroon is commonly victim to rainfalls of up to 404.6 inches each year. Good thing Mount Cameroon has the highest peak in Western Africa. At least they have spot to go if the rains get any deeper.
 
3. Quibdo, Colombia receives about 353.9 inches each showery, sopping year. With 12% of the world’s coffee being produced in Columbia, they’d better hope those beans can float!
 
4. Mount Waialeale, USA  - While Hawaii is more known for its sunshine than its rain, Mount Waialeale (translated in Hawaiian to "rippling water") is one of the wettest places in the world, averaging more than 450 inches of rain each year. Depending on which source you trust, rain falls on the 5,148-ft.-high peak between 330 and 360 days each year.
 
5. Lake Maracaibo, Venezuela - Lightning and thunder are often the most spectacular parts of living in stormy places. No one knows this better than Venezuelan locals in the Lake Maracaibo area. For 140–160 days every year, 10 hours per day and up to 280 times an hour the skies over the lake produce what can only be described as Mother Nature’s version of a Las Vegas-style laser show, gone wild.
 
6. Dartmouth, England - The UK is so rainy, it even has an online “rain radar” for forecasting the stuff. But when it passes, celestial wonders often appear.

7. Finca Bellavista, Costa Rica - In Costa Rica, rainy skies and fertile soils mean one thing: lush, lush jungle. Deep within the dense rainforest—where the rainy season brings showers everyday punctually at noon—a pioneering group of American hippies has used the rainforest canopy to set up a sustainable refuge away from modern civilization. From their tree-top dwellings, the Finca Bellavista community has developed a heightened appreciation for zip-lines and ladders, which they use to travel to and from homes 25 feet off the ground within the branches of enormous, hundred-year-old trees.

8. Glastonbury Festival, England - Rain lovers in cities the world over—including India, Wales, Norway and the United States—celebrate their favorite climate with annual festivals, but at the annual Glastonbury festival held annually in Somerset, England, the celebration carries on despite the climate. Glasto, as it's called, is known for its frequent torrential rains and floods. To keep their muddy feet happy and the dancers dancin', it's no surprise then that the festival, via fashion icon Kate Moss, is credited with inspiring the now-ubiquitous Hunter Wellies fashion trend seen all over the Western world, rain or shine. What other festival has a mantra like Glasto’s “Peace, Love, Mud”

9. Yakushima, Japan

10. Bellenden Ker, Australia

11. Henderson Lake, Canada

12. Crkvica, Bosnia

13. Emei Shan, China

14. Ureca, Equatorial Guinea

15. Bellenden Ker, Australia

16. Bowden Pen, Jamaica

17. Little Port Arthur, USA

18. Crib Goch,  Wales U.K. - Crib Goch in Snowdonia is reported to average 168.58”/4282 mm a year (POR 1941-1970) making it the wettest location in Britain, followed closely by the Lake District in England.

19. Lake District, England U.K. - In England, the central peaks of the Lake District are the wettest, more than anywhere in the rest of the country.
 
20. In Ireland, there are several spots in Co. Kerry where the annual average exceeds 3000 mm/118”yr. Based upon the Met Éireann 1961-90 averages, the wettest gauged locations in Ireland were Mt Torc (Mangerton No. 3), at 808 m AMSL, at 3230 mm/127.16”yr, and Mt Ballaghbeama (311 m AMSL) with 3224 mm/126.93” annually. Both monthly gauges have over 50 years records.

21. Melchior, Antarctic Peninsula

22. Kukui, Maui, Hawaii, Oceania

23. Cropp at Waterfall, New Zealand

24. Crkvice, Montenegro

25. Bergen, Norway

26. Mawsynram in north east India
 
27. Seattle, Washington U.S.A

28. Gabon, Africa

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